Roman Catholic Church

Roman Catholic Church

Feast of Santa Eulalia, the second Patron Saint of Barcelona the festivals of Santa Eulalia are dedicated, according to the Christian tradition, Eulalia de Barcelona, from Barcino, Hispania (current Barcelona, Spain) at the time of the Emperor Diocletian (284-305) during the century III or IV, with Marcelino as Pope. Much of the Christians who lived in the city in those times had to escape because this Roman Emperor ordered to put an end to the faithful. Currently, these festivals are aimed, above all, to the smaller, and we will see why below. Eulalia was a teenage girl who escaped from the farmhouse where he lived with his parents in Sarria (currently neighbourhood of Barcelona) to confess their ideals religious and, thus, was martyred. The young girl was the victim of various torments, as the eculeo (device of wood on which sat the defendants, to force them to declare through the torment), and died on the cross, although there are doubts about the historicity of the narrative of his martyrdom. That is why during these magical days, all pay homage to the brave Laia. According to tradition, the best-known torment was throw it rolling into a Coop full of glass broken by the street Baixada de Santa Eulalia – Bajada de Santa Eulalia-, where an image of the Saint is in a small chapel. The child, therefore, is considered, along with the Virgen de la Merce, patroness of Barcelona and symbol of Justice u commitment to youth.

She was canonized and is considered both by the Roman Catholic Church and the Orthodox Saint. Bishop Frodoino found his remains in the year 878, and moved them to the Cathedral. It was in 1998 when the craftsman Xavier Jansana decided to represent to Laia, or Eulalia, through a giantess. The festivities in tribute to this Holy include passacaglias, correfocs, and Giants. The monuments dedicated to Santa Eulalia plate of the Pedro has the legend that Eulalia remained naked on a cross in this square, and the sky covered her with a light coating of snow.

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