Air Conditioning Contractors

Air Conditioning Contractors

From the old equipment must be disposed of with care to avoid the release of refrigerant, the local jurisdiction provides guidelines. Alice Doblz, clerk in Tempe, Hellas Eire., Heating and cooling contractor in Norwalk, Conn., said that the company alerted customers about the new rules, and many consider the new unit. 'We have a house that had their offices in there for 25 years, and the usual life expectancy is 15 – 20 years, "said Ms. Doblz,' so they will eventually face the need to replace them anyway. " The government wants consumers to know that they do not have to buy any new equipment, and has taken steps to try to ensure that there will be enough R-22 or recently made or revised in order to maintain existing equipment throughout its lifetime, said Mr. Banks. "People can continue to use their existing branches, and continue to serve them, 'he said. But Some industry officials fear that the supply of R-22 to tighten about five years, increasing prices, while a gradual reduction continues, and equipment is becoming more and more dependent from recycled rather than newly made R-22.

Mack McFarland, chief atmospheric scientist at DuPont, which makes a range of refrigerants, said equipment can be retrofitted, to run on alternative refrigerants. Firms service should also include the diversion and return any removable cooler and make sure he redesigned, he added. Environmentalists, meanwhile, say that the change to HFC-410A – only halfway measure, because the new cooler, while the benefits of ozone, still throws heat, contributing to global warming. While the heat capacity of HFC-410A is lower than R-22, 'some people who still too high, 'said Charlie J. Makkradden, vice president for government relations in the Air Conditioning Contractors of America, a trade association in Arlington, Virginia. But until now, there is no widely accepted replacement for HFCs, said Mr. Makkradden. 'The first rule of the wing walk – you do not let go with one hand until you get the power to the other.

" But Curt Davis, director of the research work of Greenpeace USA in Washington, said that alternatives are already widely used in Europe and Asia, but not feasible in the U.S. market due to national and local regulatory obstacles, including security issues and building regulations. "We're in this chemical treadmill, "said Mr. Davis. "We replaced a chemical by another, and they are bad for global warming. In the process of cooling our homes and our beer, we heat the planet. We need to get out of treadmill. " Air conditioners in Dnepropetrovsk

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